Shame, Mindfulness, and the Road to Racial Justice

via the University of Washington Center for Communication, Difference, and Equity’s Interrupting Privilege Blog

Interrupting Privilege Seminar, Winter 2018

I can generally gauge how effective I am and how much I’m learning in conversations about race by how uncomfortable and challenging it is to keep going. I use my shame and fragility as a guide to point me towards the areas that need the most attention. In that way, these emotions have been invaluable partners in my efforts to interrupt privilege. Continue reading

Local, state health programs for children scramble with CHIP in limbo

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Healthcare enrollment assistant Sharissa Tjok (left) and ICHS employee, and CHIP beneficiary, Qi Qun Ma Wong (right) stand in front of the ICHS Holly Park Clinic in South Seattle. (Photo by Sarah Corn)

via the Seattle Globalist

The federal Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) is on borrowed time.

If Congress doesn’t reauthorize the program before the end of the year, federal health funding for 58,000 low-income Washington State children and pregnant women will dry up by February 2018. Continue reading

Jayapal and Smith push bill to end immigration’s private prisons

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A protestor climbed a light pole outside the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma in 2015 and hung and unfurled a sign reading “You are not alone” in Spanish to the detainees inside. (Photo by Angelica Chazaro)

via the Seattle Globalist

Seattle-area legal assistant and DREAMer Graciela Nuñez puts her fear of being detained in the U.S. immigration system in stark terms.

“I am more scared to be put in the Tacoma detention center than I am of being deported,” Nuñez said. Continue reading

Stigma, mental health and U(W): #Metoo, now what?

Me Too, Now What

Illustration by Andrew Estey

via The Daily of the University of Washington

If you or someone you know is in immediate crisis, the National Sexual Assault Hotline, 800-656-HOPE is free, confidential, and available 24/7. In an emergency, call 911. More support resources are listed below.

Y’all, it’s been a week.

As obviously necessary as it has been to see the rank infection of systematic sexual abuse finally made visible, the last seven days of emotional pin-ball has left me teetering near the edge of perpetual exhaustion.

For those who participated in last week’s #metoo hashtag resurgence, either aloud or in silence, the unpredictable and inescapable reminders of something deeply, personally painful can be a double-edge sword.

Continue reading

Stigma, mental health, and U(W): generic gaslighting part four

Stigma Mental Health and UW

Illustration by Madeline Kernan

via The Daily of the University of Washington

Welcome to part four in the the saga of generic Concerta drug substitutions. The information in part three (part two and part one for those just joining us) raised several questions about pharmacy-level processes for generics that today’s column will start to answer. But first, a little housekeeping from last time.

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Superhero comics can teach us a lot about disability representation

Omega The Unknown

Courtesy photo

via The Daily of the University of Washington

An intrinsic part of wellness is taking (or making) the time to engage in activities that bring us pleasure and connect us with others. Storytelling media, like TV and comic books, hold central and powerful positions in our culture because of their ability to satisfy those needs. But for people living with disabilities in the United States, along with those marginalized for their skin color, gender identity, or who they love, mainstream stories can cut just as deeply as they heal.

The experts on Rose City Comic Con’s “Disability in Superhero Comics” panel earlier this month discussed instances of disability representation in comic book stories, both positive and negative, and their impacts on disabled and able-bodied audiences.

Continue reading