Shame, Mindfulness, and the Road to Racial Justice

via the University of Washington Center for Communication, Difference, and Equity’s Interrupting Privilege Blog

Interrupting Privilege Seminar, Winter 2018

I can generally gauge how effective I am and how much I’m learning in conversations about race by how uncomfortable and challenging it is to keep going. I use my shame and fragility as a guide to point me towards the areas that need the most attention. In that way, these emotions have been invaluable partners in my efforts to interrupt privilege.Continue Reading

Bellevue students empower peers with stress management skills

Rosie Huang and Sachi Madan

Newport High School junior Sachi Madan (left) and sophomore Rosie Huang (right) discuss the next phase of their mental health awareness project after school on Jan. 16. (Photo courtesy of Sarah Corn/UW News Lab)

via The Bellevue Reporter

Before two Newport High School students launched a program to teach their peers about stress management, they had to prove the training was even needed.

Sophomore Rosie Huang and junior Sachi Madan knew from their own experiences all about Newport’s high-achieving academic culture. Their administrators, advisors and even classmates, however, took some convincing.

“People don’t seem to realize the magnitude of the issue,” Huang said.Continue Reading

Stigma, mental health and U(W): #Metoo, now what?

Me Too, Now What

Illustration by Andrew Estey

via The Daily of the University of Washington

If you or someone you know is in immediate crisis, the National Sexual Assault Hotline, 800-656-HOPE is free, confidential, and available 24/7. In an emergency, call 911. More support resources are listed below.

Y’all, it’s been a week.

As obviously necessary as it has been to see the rank infection of systematic sexual abuse finally made visible, the last seven days of emotional pin-ball has left me teetering near the edge of perpetual exhaustion.

For those who participated in last week’s #metoo hashtag resurgence, either aloud or in silence, the unpredictable and inescapable reminders of something deeply, personally painful can be a double-edge sword.

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Stigma, mental health, and U(W): generic gaslighting part four

Stigma Mental Health and UW

Illustration by Madeline Kernan

via The Daily of the University of Washington

Welcome to part four in the the saga of generic Concerta drug substitutions. The information in part three (part two and part one for those just joining us) raised several questions about pharmacy-level processes for generics that today’s column will start to answer. But first, a little housekeeping from last time.

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Superhero comics can teach us a lot about disability representation

Omega The Unknown

Courtesy photo

via The Daily of the University of Washington

An intrinsic part of wellness is taking (or making) the time to engage in activities that bring us pleasure and connect us with others. Storytelling media, like TV and comic books, hold central and powerful positions in our culture because of their ability to satisfy those needs. But for people living with disabilities in the United States, along with those marginalized for their skin color, gender identity, or who they love, mainstream stories can cut just as deeply as they heal.

The experts on Rose City Comic Con’s “Disability in Superhero Comics” panel earlier this month discussed instances of disability representation in comic book stories, both positive and negative, and their impacts on disabled and able-bodied audiences.

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There is no ‘I’ in self-care: mental health advice from Rose City Comic Con

RCCC 2017 Self-Care Panel

Geeky experts on Rose City Comic Con’s “Beyond Escapism: Geek Self Care” give advance on asking for help in times of stress. (Photo by Sarah Corn)

via The Daily of the University of Washington

According to the geeky experts on Rose City Comic Con’s “Beyond Escapism: Geek Self Care” panel earlier this month, the best (and hardest) advice for good self-care is this: Don’t try to go it alone.

Geeks, much like college students, spend a lot of time in relative isolation on computers and hyper-focused on goals, to the exclusion of all other needs. When distress arises, that isolation becomes an insurmountable barrier to getting help. The first step in self-care is learning to recognize what you need and when you need it.

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